Hite Art Institute Spring 2020 BFA Graduates

The Hite Art Institute is pleased to present another round of student highlights from our Spring 2020 BFA Graduates!

Artist Statement:
Sisters challenges historical portraiture by employing traditional techniques in nontraditional representations. Inspired by the models’ responses, each portrait is paralleled with an abstracted emotive depiction. Sisters reveals raw, awkward realities and layered naturalism through referencing candid photography and historic techniques such as glazing and scumbling.

Using gestures and facial expressions, each subject sends a non-verbal signal for how she wants to be perceived. Each movement can be explored as an archetypal construct and fulfilling a specific role. Through the use of proximity and visual cues, Sisters challenges the audience to draw connections between each pictorial portrayal and its abstract counterpart.

Artist Statement:

Sisters challenges historical portraiture by employing traditional techniques in nontraditional representations. Inspired by the models’ responses, each portrait is paralleled with an abstracted emotive depiction. Sisters reveals raw, awkward realities and layered naturalism through referencing candid photography and historic techniques such as glazing and scumbling.

Using gestures and facial expressions, each subject sends a non-verbal signal for how she wants to be perceived. Each movement can be explored as an archetypal construct and fulfilling a specific role. Through the use of proximity and visual cues, Sisters challenges the audience to draw connections between each pictorial portrayal and its abstract counterpart.

Meet EB: EB enjoys experimenting and bringing different mediums into her design work and adding a bit of a whimsical flare if she can. Currently she’s teaching herself motion graphics to add to her toolkit.

You can see more at eblovesbees.com.

Meet Camille: Although my passions are typography, branding, and illustration, challenges excite me. I’m never one to pass up an opportunity to add more learning tools to my toolbox. Graphic design has become such a prominent part of my life and it amazes me  to see the way designs transform and interact with the real world. Want to see more?

You can see more at her site or follow her on Instagram.

Overall, humans want to belong and are therefore willing to attempt to numb socially unacceptable emotions.

My work provides a vacillation between voluntary and involuntary vulnerability. Each installation is a reference to sixteenth-century Dutch vanitas paintings, which symbolize the transience of life and inevitability of death. Likewise, my work represents the inevitability and necessity of vulnerability. However, rather than utilizing decadent décor in my installations, I include everyday objects more likely to be found in a modern-day home so that my work is familiar to the contemporary viewer.

Artist Statement: Vulnerability is an integral part of the human condition, yet it is often stigmatized and deemed a weakness. People who allow themselves to be vulnerable are often those who are most content or happy with their lives because these people are often the most confident and at ease. The stigmatization of vulnerability is thus due to fear of isolation, rejection, and judgement.

Each piece is dimly lit in order to provide a comforting, idyllic atmosphere, allowing the viewer a sense of privacy and peace. As the viewer sits down, they notice the food on the table is rotting, which provides a moment of quiet disruption. However, the majority of the decaying food smells pungent and sweet, offering a reconciliation to the previous state of unease in the work. Each space is seated for one person, rather than multiple, in order to further reconcile the work with a quiet intimacy. As the viewer fluctuates between comfort and unease, my work provides a space that is exclusive to them in that moment. Rather than to further isolate the act of vulnerability, my work expands the experience to public grounds (the exhibition space), which provides an acknowledgment and acceptance of the experience.

For more from Bailey you can visit her website: www.baileyoleary.weebly.com or check her out on Instagram: @baileyoleary97

Meet Michael: In addition to his classes at UofL, Michael works as a freelance designer and an art library assistant. He is always looking for an opportunity for visual research and inspiration.

See more of Michael’s work at michaelchoudesign.com.

To see more from all our BFA graduates head to our website Here.
You can also find the digital graphic design showcase here and the digital interior design showcase here

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